divineofficial:

Divine (as Lady Divine) from John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs, 1970

divineofficial:

Divine (as Lady Divine) from John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs, 1970

(Source: facebook.com, via unclephranc)

poison303:

Punk…the pinball machine. Produced by Gottlieb, year unknown. Apparently the company wanted to feature the names of various (great) bands, but never got permission from the bands themselves, so the playing field is decorated with graffiti-style tags for “The Clas,” “Sex Pist” and the “ead Bo.” Note persuasive ad pitch: “Not many teenagers will pass up the chance to try Punk. Feature it to build traffic in your location.”

(Source: indrahatton, via tretilldeath)

lochnessa:

floppyhump:

invocationwithin:

loosetoon:

Early 70’s behind the scenes of Sesame Street with the Muppets.

THIS IS THE BEST PHOTO SET I HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED. 

Love!

one of the best tv series ever
poison303:

From Outer Space….to Detroit. 1981-ish.

poison303:

From Outer Space….to Detroit. 1981-ish.

rhamphotheca:

Why You Should Appreciate the Humble Beaver
The rodents are the geoengineers of the American West.
by Chip Ward
During a long career with the Bureau of Land Management, Sage Sorenson saw firsthand how beavers created rich green habitat out of overgrazed and burned-over land. Now retired, he calls himself a “beaver believer” and devotes his days to monitoring and protecting scattered “remnant” beaver colonies in our region. Quietly but persistently, he advocates for their reintroduction onto stressed landscapes that need their services.
Beavers are the original geo-engineers. It’s no exaggeration to credit them for their major role in building the North American landscape. In pre-colonial times, there were as many as 400 million of them. They used their big buckteeth and tough paddle-tails to build dams across every stream imaginable, spreading water to a Noah’s Ark-worth of creatures that thrive in the wet habitats they create. Now, of course, they are mostly long gone from the land, and conservationists want them back…
(read more: Mother Jones)
photograph by BlackMagic/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Why You Should Appreciate the Humble Beaver

The rodents are the geoengineers of the American West.

by Chip Ward

During a long career with the Bureau of Land Management, Sage Sorenson saw firsthand how beavers created rich green habitat out of overgrazed and burned-over land. Now retired, he calls himself a “beaver believer” and devotes his days to monitoring and protecting scattered “remnant” beaver colonies in our region. Quietly but persistently, he advocates for their reintroduction onto stressed landscapes that need their services.

Beavers are the original geo-engineers. It’s no exaggeration to credit them for their major role in building the North American landscape. In pre-colonial times, there were as many as 400 million of them. They used their big buckteeth and tough paddle-tails to build dams across every stream imaginable, spreading water to a Noah’s Ark-worth of creatures that thrive in the wet habitats they create. Now, of course, they are mostly long gone from the land, and conservationists want them back…

(read more: Mother Jones)

photograph by

poison303:

D. Boon, Minutemen, 1984?

poison303:

D. Boon, Minutemen, 1984?

thatmandakid:

my god i love pigs 

thatmandakid:

my god i love pigs 

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via thinkveganworld)

(Source: yogadudes, via mavkydz)